When Drake Ain't Enough

Talent is never enough. With few exceptions, the best players are the hardest workers.

 –Magic Johnson



I’m sure everyone reading this entry is familiar with one, Aubrey Graham a.k.a. October’s Very Own, a.k.a. Drake. However, what some of you may not know is that his stage name, Drake, also doubles as an acronym which stands for: Do Right and Kill Everything. You can thank us later for the trivia fact.

 

D.R.A.K.E. is also the name we here at Team Diplomat have ascribed to a syndrome many millennials suffer from during their “Quarter-Life Crisis.” The Quarter-Life Crisis is a very crappy period of life that usually strikes between your mid-twenties and early thirties, and can last for years, months or a few days if you’re lucky. During this period, a person often questions her personal and professional paths, freaks out about what his future holds and seriously wonders how they can feel like they’ve been doing most things right in their lives to this point but still have little to nothing to show for it. Not to mention, they also begin to feel doubtful about their own lives, and this is all brought on by the stress of becoming an adult. It’s like a “Mid-Life Crisis” but it hits at a younger age and comes without the sports cars and talks with your family about your desire to hike the Andes or go base-jumping. 


While most people don’t believe in a Quarter Life Crisis when they first hear about it, it becomes all too real when it finally hits, like a Tyson uppercut, followed by a Chun-Li kick, topped off with a Mortal Kombat finishing move. It makes you feel like you’re “not where you’re supposed to be,” which is the epitome of D.R.A.K.E. Syndrome. Those who suffer from D.R.A.K.E. Syndrome typically believe that because they go to school (graduate), do good things (not mandated by a court order), acquire and develop (useful) skills, and get a (“good”) job, they’ll be successful and live happily ever after.  Sadly, this is so far from reality we have to laugh heartily at your grave confusion as to how the world works. Ha. But, actually, we can laugh because we once had the same misguided beliefs. Then we grew up.


Despite what society, our family, friends and mentors have taught us, talent is only part of the success equation; hard work, focus and resiliency make up the other elements. Being successful is about employing “The Three C’s”: Competence, Confidence and Connections. Competence means knowing your trade or skill to the best of your ability and never settling for anything less than your best. Confidence is having faith that your knowledge has equipped you to solve any problem in your wheelhouse and knowing that if you don’t have it, you can get it. Connections will get you IN doors the other two C’s may only be able to get you TO.  Combine all 3 and you have tools for success! 


Talent is great, but it’s not enough. Most coaches, employers and teachers will tell you that if they had to choose between talent and work ethic from a player, employee, or student, they’d choose the latter every time. While you can’t coach a 4.3 second 40 yard dash, a 40 inch vertical, or pipes akin to “Old Blue Eyes” or Mariah Carey (90’s/Early 2000s version), you also can’t force them to work if they don’t want to (see U.S. Constitution). 


As you travel the road to success towards the corner office, the overpriced designer shoes/handbag, and the executive title, be sure to carry with you Competence and Confidence, and make Connections along the way. 


Even with these tools of success, you also have to know that you won’t make every shot that you take, but you still must take them because you miss 100% of the shots you don’t take. No matter how closely you stick to the blueprint, life will still hand you some lemons. Take those lemons and turn them into lemonade (or a lemon drop martini) and “Keep Walking.” Starting today, work like every project, client, or job is your last because one day you’ll find your perfect job and you’ll be right. Good luck! 



Many of us are taught that if we go to school (graduate), do good things (not mandated by a court order), acquire and develop (useful) skills, and get a (“good”) job, we’ll be successful and live happily ever after. Overreliance on this tenets are clears signs of D.R.A.K.E. Syndrome. Read this week’s #TeamDiplomatBlog for more. http://diplomaticenterprises.com/when-drake-aint-enough/ 


Talent is never enough. With few exceptions, the best players are the hardest workers.

 –Magic Johnson #DRAKE #TeamDiplomatBlog http://diplomaticenterprises.com/when-drake-aint-enough/


Despite what society, your family, friends and mentors have taught you, talent is only part of the success equation; hard work, focus and resiliency make up the other elements. http://diplomaticenterprises.com/when-drake-aint-enough/ 


We all will come up short sometimes, but you miss 100% of the shots you don’t take so don’t be afraid to try. http://diplomaticenterprises.com/when-drake-aint-enough/ 


No matter how closely you stick to the blueprint, life will still hand you some lemons. Take those lemons and turn them into lemonade (or a lemon drop martini) and “Keep Walking.”  http://diplomaticenterprises.com/when-drake-aint-enough/


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